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Tama Gucci has a knack for pushing the envelope. The Miami-raised, New York-based singer, producer and DJ's long awaited debut album, Notes to Self, is the culmination of years of forward-thinking pop songwriting and creating intricate club soundscapes. It tracks his evolution from fun-loving cover artist and studious songwriter/producer to self-assured, wholly encompassing visionary. What began as a bedroom SoundCloud project to cover and remix popular songs, quickly blossomed into something far greater. Tama began to write, produce and perform his own music and became enamored with his hometown's queer underground rave scene. For a debut album, Notes to Self sounds rather seasoned, with he fearlessly dipping in and out of various styles, from the warped rock of "Runaway Pup" and the thrumming dance-oriented R&B of "Didn't Have To" to the blinking electro-pop of "Back Then" and moody, atmospheric techno of "You Lost Me." The one word that best captures his approach to dance music is "tender," with his soft, breathy voice-inspired by Y2K pop artists like t.A.T.u. And Frou Frou-cresting atop waves of throttling beats with a warm sensuality and divine omnipotence. But that's not the only way he utilizes his voice on this album. With songs like "Out of the Loop" and "Stalk Me 151 to 170," he dramatically pitch-shifts his vocals over industrial throbs and cutesy hyperpop, respectively, to invigorating effect.It's easy to lean into the escapism of the music, but lyrically, the album is quite rewarding for anyone paying attention. It's an unabashedly romantic and brooding record, predominantly centering self-growth and happiness and gleaning wisdom from past mistakes. Sprinkling sobering moments of clarity into dance music was a meaningful choice for him, who cherished songs of a similar vein as a child. "One of my favorite songs that I specifically remember waiting for the radio to play when I was 10 years old was 'Cry for You' by September," he says. "I always admired how it was a sweet, sad song, but also a breakthrough clarity moment over a club beat, and that's definitely something I wanted to capture." In several ways, Notes to Self is a post-breakup clarity album, as it brims with glaringly straightforward, honest lines about coming back into yourself, contemplating your true priorities and forging towards a new, healthier relationship where you can finally breathe again. "Good Morning Babe" is about reveling in the unexpectedness of a new day, "See You Later" is an empowering realization that a relationship has run it's course and "At The Moon" chronicles the ecstatic, fairytale-like rush of fresh romance. He describes the record as reimagined Notes app musings and journal entries, and while the album's stylistic experimentalism was fortified by late-night, weed smoke-glazed recording sessions, it's stark candidness was influenced by the daytime writing stints that wrapped up the LP. Notes to Self also arrives at the perfect time for Tama Gucci, who's become a staple of New York City's queer electronic underground. He's opened for the likes of Erika de Casier and Christine and the Queens, and guested on Caroline Polachek's Club Quarantine set. He has also been making waves in the fashion world where he's scored New York and Milan Fashion Week runway shows for Mirror Palais, Prabal Gurung and Moschino alongside his partner and fellow DJ, Matthew Mazur; has modeled for the likes of tastemakers like Telfar and more, and he also helms his own brand of tongue-in-cheek handmade apparel & clothing, Tama's Corner. Tama Gucci is immensely proud of how far he has come, and is rightly excited by the prospect of people hearing Notes to Self.
Tama Gucci has a knack for pushing the envelope. The Miami-raised, New York-based singer, producer and DJ's long awaited debut album, Notes to Self, is the culmination of years of forward-thinking pop songwriting and creating intricate club soundscapes. It tracks his evolution from fun-loving cover artist and studious songwriter/producer to self-assured, wholly encompassing visionary. What began as a bedroom SoundCloud project to cover and remix popular songs, quickly blossomed into something far greater. Tama began to write, produce and perform his own music and became enamored with his hometown's queer underground rave scene. For a debut album, Notes to Self sounds rather seasoned, with he fearlessly dipping in and out of various styles, from the warped rock of "Runaway Pup" and the thrumming dance-oriented R&B of "Didn't Have To" to the blinking electro-pop of "Back Then" and moody, atmospheric techno of "You Lost Me." The one word that best captures his approach to dance music is "tender," with his soft, breathy voice-inspired by Y2K pop artists like t.A.T.u. And Frou Frou-cresting atop waves of throttling beats with a warm sensuality and divine omnipotence. But that's not the only way he utilizes his voice on this album. With songs like "Out of the Loop" and "Stalk Me 151 to 170," he dramatically pitch-shifts his vocals over industrial throbs and cutesy hyperpop, respectively, to invigorating effect.It's easy to lean into the escapism of the music, but lyrically, the album is quite rewarding for anyone paying attention. It's an unabashedly romantic and brooding record, predominantly centering self-growth and happiness and gleaning wisdom from past mistakes. Sprinkling sobering moments of clarity into dance music was a meaningful choice for him, who cherished songs of a similar vein as a child. "One of my favorite songs that I specifically remember waiting for the radio to play when I was 10 years old was 'Cry for You' by September," he says. "I always admired how it was a sweet, sad song, but also a breakthrough clarity moment over a club beat, and that's definitely something I wanted to capture." In several ways, Notes to Self is a post-breakup clarity album, as it brims with glaringly straightforward, honest lines about coming back into yourself, contemplating your true priorities and forging towards a new, healthier relationship where you can finally breathe again. "Good Morning Babe" is about reveling in the unexpectedness of a new day, "See You Later" is an empowering realization that a relationship has run it's course and "At The Moon" chronicles the ecstatic, fairytale-like rush of fresh romance. He describes the record as reimagined Notes app musings and journal entries, and while the album's stylistic experimentalism was fortified by late-night, weed smoke-glazed recording sessions, it's stark candidness was influenced by the daytime writing stints that wrapped up the LP. Notes to Self also arrives at the perfect time for Tama Gucci, who's become a staple of New York City's queer electronic underground. He's opened for the likes of Erika de Casier and Christine and the Queens, and guested on Caroline Polachek's Club Quarantine set. He has also been making waves in the fashion world where he's scored New York and Milan Fashion Week runway shows for Mirror Palais, Prabal Gurung and Moschino alongside his partner and fellow DJ, Matthew Mazur; has modeled for the likes of tastemakers like Telfar and more, and he also helms his own brand of tongue-in-cheek handmade apparel & clothing, Tama's Corner. Tama Gucci is immensely proud of how far he has come, and is rightly excited by the prospect of people hearing Notes to Self.
858458008020
Tama Gucci - Notes To Self

Details

Format: CD
Label: SINDERLYN
Rel. Date: 08/16/2024
UPC: 858458008020

Notes To Self
Artist: Tama Gucci
Format: CD
New: Available $14.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Goodmorning Babe
2. Out of the Loop
3. Runaway Pup
4. No More "I Love You's"
5. Didn't Have to
6. Stalk Me 151 to 170
7. Wanna Know You
8. At the Moon
9. Only Smoke Trees
10. See You Later
11. Back Then
12. You Lost Me

More Info:

Tama Gucci has a knack for pushing the envelope. The Miami-raised, New York-based singer, producer and DJ's long awaited debut album, Notes to Self, is the culmination of years of forward-thinking pop songwriting and creating intricate club soundscapes. It tracks his evolution from fun-loving cover artist and studious songwriter/producer to self-assured, wholly encompassing visionary. What began as a bedroom SoundCloud project to cover and remix popular songs, quickly blossomed into something far greater. Tama began to write, produce and perform his own music and became enamored with his hometown's queer underground rave scene. For a debut album, Notes to Self sounds rather seasoned, with he fearlessly dipping in and out of various styles, from the warped rock of "Runaway Pup" and the thrumming dance-oriented R&B of "Didn't Have To" to the blinking electro-pop of "Back Then" and moody, atmospheric techno of "You Lost Me." The one word that best captures his approach to dance music is "tender," with his soft, breathy voice-inspired by Y2K pop artists like t.A.T.u. And Frou Frou-cresting atop waves of throttling beats with a warm sensuality and divine omnipotence. But that's not the only way he utilizes his voice on this album. With songs like "Out of the Loop" and "Stalk Me 151 to 170," he dramatically pitch-shifts his vocals over industrial throbs and cutesy hyperpop, respectively, to invigorating effect.It's easy to lean into the escapism of the music, but lyrically, the album is quite rewarding for anyone paying attention. It's an unabashedly romantic and brooding record, predominantly centering self-growth and happiness and gleaning wisdom from past mistakes. Sprinkling sobering moments of clarity into dance music was a meaningful choice for him, who cherished songs of a similar vein as a child. "One of my favorite songs that I specifically remember waiting for the radio to play when I was 10 years old was 'Cry for You' by September," he says. "I always admired how it was a sweet, sad song, but also a breakthrough clarity moment over a club beat, and that's definitely something I wanted to capture." In several ways, Notes to Self is a post-breakup clarity album, as it brims with glaringly straightforward, honest lines about coming back into yourself, contemplating your true priorities and forging towards a new, healthier relationship where you can finally breathe again. "Good Morning Babe" is about reveling in the unexpectedness of a new day, "See You Later" is an empowering realization that a relationship has run it's course and "At The Moon" chronicles the ecstatic, fairytale-like rush of fresh romance. He describes the record as reimagined Notes app musings and journal entries, and while the album's stylistic experimentalism was fortified by late-night, weed smoke-glazed recording sessions, it's stark candidness was influenced by the daytime writing stints that wrapped up the LP. Notes to Self also arrives at the perfect time for Tama Gucci, who's become a staple of New York City's queer electronic underground. He's opened for the likes of Erika de Casier and Christine and the Queens, and guested on Caroline Polachek's Club Quarantine set. He has also been making waves in the fashion world where he's scored New York and Milan Fashion Week runway shows for Mirror Palais, Prabal Gurung and Moschino alongside his partner and fellow DJ, Matthew Mazur; has modeled for the likes of tastemakers like Telfar and more, and he also helms his own brand of tongue-in-cheek handmade apparel & clothing, Tama's Corner. Tama Gucci is immensely proud of how far he has come, and is rightly excited by the prospect of people hearing Notes to Self.
        
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