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Factory Records

Maya Magub writes: "The Covid-19 pandemic impacted the arts in many diverse ways, not all detrimental. History has always seen the arts flourish in times of hardship, and this was no different, spawning some incredible innovations out of necessity. Soon after news of the virus' spread came to light, the movie studios here in Los Angeles found a solution to the restraints of lockdowns and social distancing by helping players like me to set up temporary home studios. Miraculously, we were able to record full movie scores remotely, and I found myself learning basic engineering skills. With this new skillset that had become part of everyday life for many musicians, I was excited to realize that it was possible to play 'together' with other musicians, despite not sharing a physical space, by recording separately. It suddenly occurred to me that the perfect fit for this 'remote chamber music' was the musical canon. In our new age of Zoom, this process became more like sending a 'musical letter' by mail, each of us recording as a leader and then waiting to follow and be inspired by another player in the next canon. The project evolved into a truly creative collaboration, with emails and internet calls across time zones about musical ideas as well as the technical process of recording. With the constraints of recording in separate spaces and very different acoustics came the opportunity to position microphones very closely. Without using too much of each performer's live acoustic and through close microphone positioning, we were able to capture a very 'real' and immediate sound which communicates vividly and could later be put into the same virtual acoustic or musical 'space'."
Maya Magub writes: "The Covid-19 pandemic impacted the arts in many diverse ways, not all detrimental. History has always seen the arts flourish in times of hardship, and this was no different, spawning some incredible innovations out of necessity. Soon after news of the virus' spread came to light, the movie studios here in Los Angeles found a solution to the restraints of lockdowns and social distancing by helping players like me to set up temporary home studios. Miraculously, we were able to record full movie scores remotely, and I found myself learning basic engineering skills. With this new skillset that had become part of everyday life for many musicians, I was excited to realize that it was possible to play 'together' with other musicians, despite not sharing a physical space, by recording separately. It suddenly occurred to me that the perfect fit for this 'remote chamber music' was the musical canon. In our new age of Zoom, this process became more like sending a 'musical letter' by mail, each of us recording as a leader and then waiting to follow and be inspired by another player in the next canon. The project evolved into a truly creative collaboration, with emails and internet calls across time zones about musical ideas as well as the technical process of recording. With the constraints of recording in separate spaces and very different acoustics came the opportunity to position microphones very closely. Without using too much of each performer's live acoustic and through close microphone positioning, we were able to capture a very 'real' and immediate sound which communicates vividly and could later be put into the same virtual acoustic or musical 'space'."
708093354221

Details

Format: CD
Label: CRD
Rel. Date: 10/07/2022
UPC: 708093354221

More Info:

Maya Magub writes: "The Covid-19 pandemic impacted the arts in many diverse ways, not all detrimental. History has always seen the arts flourish in times of hardship, and this was no different, spawning some incredible innovations out of necessity. Soon after news of the virus' spread came to light, the movie studios here in Los Angeles found a solution to the restraints of lockdowns and social distancing by helping players like me to set up temporary home studios. Miraculously, we were able to record full movie scores remotely, and I found myself learning basic engineering skills. With this new skillset that had become part of everyday life for many musicians, I was excited to realize that it was possible to play 'together' with other musicians, despite not sharing a physical space, by recording separately. It suddenly occurred to me that the perfect fit for this 'remote chamber music' was the musical canon. In our new age of Zoom, this process became more like sending a 'musical letter' by mail, each of us recording as a leader and then waiting to follow and be inspired by another player in the next canon. The project evolved into a truly creative collaboration, with emails and internet calls across time zones about musical ideas as well as the technical process of recording. With the constraints of recording in separate spaces and very different acoustics came the opportunity to position microphones very closely. Without using too much of each performer's live acoustic and through close microphone positioning, we were able to capture a very 'real' and immediate sound which communicates vividly and could later be put into the same virtual acoustic or musical 'space'."
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